Prinseps


The Course of the Empire Series

One of the United State’s first landscape artists, Thomas Cole, can be considered as the father of the Hudson River School. Cole romanticized the wilderness of upstate New York. To him, wilderness and nature were meant to admired and respected. It was never meant to be controlled, tamed and made civilized.

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It’s All Greek to Me!

Alexander the Great can be said to be responsible for the Greek influence in Ancient India. He started to conquer kingdoms in the east and made it all the way the modern Pakistan and the Indian state of Gujarat. He turned back once he was defeated by King Porus in 326 BCE.

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Somnath Hore (1921 – 2006)

Somnath Hore was one of the most prominent political artist and activist of post-independence India. His affiliation to the Communist Party at an early age, strongly influenced his artistic ideologies and methods of art practice. However, his career as a student of art and later as an art practitioner was unlike his contemporaries.

Read More

Sailoz Mukherjee (1906-1960)

Sailoz Mukherjee was one of the pioneering figures of modern Indian art in the twentieth century. During the early forties, when India was at the peak of its struggle to attain her own independence and identity, the art community of the country was striving to locate their indigenous understanding of modernity.

Read More

K G Subramanyan (1924-2016)

K G Subramanyan’s artistic oeuvre reflects the synthesised modernism in post-independence India, that was devised to accommodate the varied Indian artistic aesthetics and history as a continuation of cultural pursuits. His engagement with the traditional forms and materials, rooted in the country’s psyche, steered a liberated generation of artists, in reconfiguring a more cohesive identity of Indian modernism.

Read More

JAMINI ROY (1887 -1972)

One of the most iconic figures of modern Indian art of the mid-20th century, Jamini Roy’s reputation spilled over from the art world into a larger public and popular domain, and even as his name became synonymous in modern Indian art history with a reinvented "Bengali folk" style.

Read More

The Course of the Empire Series

One of the United State’s first landscape artists, Thomas Cole, can be considered as the father of the Hudson River School. Cole romanticized the wilderness of upstate New York. To him, wilderness and nature were meant to admired and respected. It was never meant to be controlled, tamed and made civilized.

Read More

It’s All Greek to Me!

Alexander the Great can be said to be responsible for the Greek influence in Ancient India. He started to conquer kingdoms in the east and made it all the way the modern Pakistan and the Indian state of Gujarat. He turned back once he was defeated by King Porus in 326 BCE.

Read More

Somnath Hore (1921 – 2006)

Somnath Hore was one of the most prominent political artist and activist of post-independence India. His affiliation to the Communist Party at an early age, strongly influenced his artistic ideologies and methods of art practice. However, his career as a student of art and later as an art practitioner was unlike his contemporaries.

Read More

Sailoz Mukherjee (1906-1960)

Sailoz Mukherjee was one of the pioneering figures of modern Indian art in the twentieth century. During the early forties, when India was at the peak of its struggle to attain her own independence and identity, the art community of the country was striving to locate their indigenous understanding of modernity.

Read More

K G Subramanyan (1924-2016)

K G Subramanyan’s artistic oeuvre reflects the synthesised modernism in post-independence India, that was devised to accommodate the varied Indian artistic aesthetics and history as a continuation of cultural pursuits. His engagement with the traditional forms and materials, rooted in the country’s psyche, steered a liberated generation of artists, in reconfiguring a more cohesive identity of Indian modernism.

Read More

JAMINI ROY (1887 -1972)

One of the most iconic figures of modern Indian art of the mid-20th century, Jamini Roy’s reputation spilled over from the art world into a larger public and popular domain, and even as his name became synonymous in modern Indian art history with a reinvented "Bengali folk" style.

Read More