Prinseps


F.N. Souza Head - Ink On Paper

Francis Newton Souza was born in 1924 in Saligao, Goa. Souza was expelled for his behaviour while studying at the Sir J J School of Art in Mumbai. In 1947, he founded the Progressive Artists' Group along with S H Raza, M F Husain and K H Ara, among others. Souza's style created thought-provoking and powerful images.

Read More

Jamini Roy's Alpana - 1930s

Jamini Roy, who was inspired by folk traditions created an Alpana or a floral motif that was considered to be sacred painting in Bengal because it was done on special occasions. The alpana which is usually done with hands and rice paint on the floor was done with tempera on cloth instead. Roy used abstraction, rejected the typical western style of painting with folk line and color. He invented his own style which was inspired by primitivism and with stronger colors, simplification, and pattern.

Read More

Bimal Dasgupta Abstract Landscape

Bimal Dasgupta spent his childhood in Behrampur in Bengal. After completing his art education from the Government College of Arts and Crafts, Calcutta, and he embarked on a career as a landscape artist. Bimal Dasgupta’s paintings present variations on the theme of petals. He painted landscapes that showed his appreciation for nature and colours. Although he was primarily interested in watercolours; he also experimented with acrylic paint and oil as well. However, his preferred medium remained watercolour after he found out that he was allergic to turpentine. Using an array of realistic images as well as completely abstract forms, Dasgupta used textural changes and bright colour schemes, making his landscapes come alive with shifting shapes and barely visible forms.

Read More

K S Kulkarni "Red Landscape"

After a diploma in Fine Arts specializing in Murals in 1940 and a postgraduate course from Sir J.J. School of Art, Mumbai, KS Kulkarni went to Delhi in 1943 to study textile design. In 1945, he quit his job and joined the art department of the Delhi Polytechnic and became a member of Delhi’s All India Fine Arts and Crafts Society. In 1947, he founded two creative spaces: Delhi Shilpi Chakra and Triveni Kala Sangam.

Read More

Ganesh Haloi Transitive Abstraction

Ganesh Haloi, born in 1936 in Jamalpur (now in Bangladesh) moved to Calcutta after the partition. As a result, he had seen the country struggle for its freedom and its own identity. Haloi’s works are known for their composition of space, color, form, and narration.  Each has a different dialogue and tone through these factors.

Read More

Krishen Khanna: Bandwala with Dog

On the canvas, Krishen Khanna's main concern has been with the human condition and its moral predicament. His approach to this came from a search for allegories that lent themselves to pictorial interpretation and irony. One of his most popular themes are the ‘bandwallahs’ whom Khanna encountered when he was driving out of the Garhi studios in New Delhi. They were subjects from daily life were refugees after the partition of 1947. Many people on both sides of the border lost family and homes. At the same time, there were bands playing happy tunes. The Band members were dressed up and were in tatters at the same time. Khanna saw this as a metaphor for life; life has both tragic and happy moments that occur at the same time. 

Read More

Biren De Tantric Abstraction

Known for his Neo-Tantric paintings, Biren De molded an artistic career for himself across five decades, beginning as a portrait painter. The early works were figurative and strongly influenced by Post-Impressionist European painters. He gradually evolved into abstraction and by the sixties had abandoned figuration altogether, developing what became known as his signature ‘Neo-tantric’ style. His tantric style works show symmetrical patterns of geometry, concentric rings, crescents, and orbs. The presence of tantric symbols such as the mandala, phallus, and vagina which represent the masculine and feminine energies of the universe. De’s tantric works often had dark blues and bright reds which were meant to awaken the psyche towards an undivided consciousness.

Read More

Raghu Rai Photographs

Raghu Rai started taking photographs when he was 23 years old. In 1966, he joined the staff at The Statesman in Delhi. Henri Cartier-Bresson nominated Rai to join Magnum Photos in 1977 after seeing his work in an exhibition in Paris. From 1982 until 1992, Rai was the director of photography for India Today. There, he worked on special issues and designs, contributing trailblazing picture essays on social, political and cultural themes, many of which became the talking point of the magazine.

Read More

Jamini Roy: Sculpture Sketch

Jamini Roy’s inspiration of folk art led him to experiment with sculpture along with paintings and sketches even though he had no formal sculpture training. This artwork depicts a preparatory sketch of three sculptures similar to crude dolls from folk art. The viewer can see the block of wood and how Roy has planned on removing sections to make a complete sculpture. While this doll sculpture looks different from the typical doll, it can be considered to be an altered, expressionist version of it. The drawings are works on their own but his sculptures are more than just complements to his drawings. Intrigued by shadows, frontal view, silhouettes and the profile view of the sculpture, Roy uses the sketches to plan out his ideas on paper.

Read More

F N Souza's Noel Chemical

Francis Newton Souza was on modern India’s leaders of art and is known for his organic and complex growth in his works. In 1976, Souza migrated to New York and redefined his style of art. It was there that he developed his style of bold lines and cross-hatchings. Souza was known for his head portraits and also went on to use a chemical alteration and mixed media on posters and magazine covers. The chemical alterations was a method by which he used a chemical solvent on printed paper without destroying the surface. The ‘Souza head’ became one of his signature styles where he depicted a distorted head. Here, we can see Souza’s individuality and style defined and established with a felt pen on Christmas poster which has some chemical alterations.

Read More

Zainul Abedin: Bengal Famine

The Bengal Famine of 1943 -1944 ruined the lives of over three million people undivided India during WWII. The British allowed a diversion of food resources and drained the economy due to wartime industrial production. With the threat of a Japanese attack on Burma, the British carried out a boat denial and scorch plan that resulted in mass starvation. Zainul Abedin, who was born in undivided India witnessed the famine first hand. His sketches were made with his own ink by burning charcoal and used it on cheap, ordinary packing paper. He depicted starving, skeletal figures who were dying on the streets. These works became iconic images and helped Abedin find his way in a realistic approach that focused on human suffering, struggle, and protest.

Read More

Jamini Roy's Village Women

Jamini Roy's rejection of the western academic style of painting led to him being inspired by  Bengali folk paintings. Before he made the complete switch to the pat style paintings, he was depicting village life and folk. This work shows a personal reconstruction of another Indian reality that was often not seen in urban areas. Possibly an attempt to have art that could be accessible to a larger Indian audience, Roy broke away from classical traditions of art. Making his own paints, he experimented with his style and mediums. This work shows his typical hues of blue, yellows, red and browns that he made from local pigments.

Read More

Francis Newton Souza's Goan Village

Born in 1924, Souza is best known for being one of the founding members of the Progressive Artists Group. Francis Newton Souza’s ‘Goan Village’  is an early masterpiece of the Goa born artist.

Read More

Double Sided Ram Kumar : Mazes o...

Ram Kumar was an essential part of the first generation of postcolonial Indian artists.  He was born in Shimla, Himachal Pradesh in 1924 and was a member of the Bombay Progressive Artists Group along with other popular artists like Husain, Raza and Sadanand Bakre.

Read More

Steinway: Concert Grand Model D

Steinway & Sons, was established in 1853 in Manhattan by a German piano builder named Heinrich Engelhard. Steinway has since become well known for producing and inventing new techniques ever since they started the business. Today, they are arguably one of the best piano manufacturers in the world.

Read More

The Course of the Empire Series

One of the United State’s first landscape artists, Thomas Cole, can be considered as the father of the Hudson River School. Cole romanticized the wilderness of upstate New York. To him, wilderness and nature were meant to admired and respected. It was never meant to be controlled, tamed and made civilized.

Read More

It’s All Greek to Me!

Alexander the Great can be said to be responsible for the Greek influence in Ancient India. He started to conquer kingdoms in the east and made it all the way the modern Pakistan and the Indian state of Gujarat. He turned back once he was defeated by King Porus in 326 BCE.

Read More

Somnath Hore (1921 – 2006)

Somnath Hore was one of the most prominent political artist and activist of post-independence India. His affiliation to the Communist Party at an early age, strongly influenced his artistic ideologies and methods of art practice. However, his career as a student of art and later as an art practitioner was unlike his contemporaries.

Read More

Sailoz Mukherjee (1906-1960)

Sailoz Mukherjee was one of the pioneering figures of modern Indian art in the twentieth century. During the early forties, when India was at the peak of its struggle to attain her own independence and identity, the art community of the country was striving to locate their indigenous understanding of modernity.

Read More

K G Subramanyan (1924-2016)

K G Subramanyan’s artistic oeuvre reflects the synthesised modernism in post-independence India, that was devised to accommodate the varied Indian artistic aesthetics and history as a continuation of cultural pursuits. His engagement with the traditional forms and materials, rooted in the country’s psyche, steered a liberated generation of artists, in reconfiguring a more cohesive identity of Indian modernism.

Read More

F.N. Souza Head - Ink On Paper

Francis Newton Souza was born in 1924 in Saligao, Goa. Souza was expelled for his behaviour while studying at the Sir J J School of Art in Mumbai. In 1947, he founded the Progressive Artists' Group along with S H Raza, M F Husain and K H Ara, among others. Souza's style created thought-provoking and powerful images.

Read More

Jamini Roy's Alpana - 1930s

Jamini Roy, who was inspired by folk traditions created an Alpana or a floral motif that was considered to be sacred painting in Bengal because it was done on special occasions. The alpana which is usually done with hands and rice paint on the floor was done with tempera on cloth instead. Roy used abstraction, rejected the typical western style of painting with folk line and color. He invented his own style which was inspired by primitivism and with stronger colors, simplification, and pattern.

Read More

Bimal Dasgupta Abstract Landscape

Bimal Dasgupta spent his childhood in Behrampur in Bengal. After completing his art education from the Government College of Arts and Crafts, Calcutta, and he embarked on a career as a landscape artist. Bimal Dasgupta’s paintings present variations on the theme of petals. He painted landscapes that showed his appreciation for nature and colours. Although he was primarily interested in watercolours; he also experimented with acrylic paint and oil as well. However, his preferred medium remained watercolour after he found out that he was allergic to turpentine. Using an array of realistic images as well as completely abstract forms, Dasgupta used textural changes and bright colour schemes, making his landscapes come alive with shifting shapes and barely visible forms.

Read More

K S Kulkarni "Red Landscape"

After a diploma in Fine Arts specializing in Murals in 1940 and a postgraduate course from Sir J.J. School of Art, Mumbai, KS Kulkarni went to Delhi in 1943 to study textile design. In 1945, he quit his job and joined the art department of the Delhi Polytechnic and became a member of Delhi’s All India Fine Arts and Crafts Society. In 1947, he founded two creative spaces: Delhi Shilpi Chakra and Triveni Kala Sangam.

Read More

Ganesh Haloi Transitive Abstraction

Ganesh Haloi, born in 1936 in Jamalpur (now in Bangladesh) moved to Calcutta after the partition. As a result, he had seen the country struggle for its freedom and its own identity. Haloi’s works are known for their composition of space, color, form, and narration.  Each has a different dialogue and tone through these factors.

Read More

Krishen Khanna: Bandwala with Dog

On the canvas, Krishen Khanna's main concern has been with the human condition and its moral predicament. His approach to this came from a search for allegories that lent themselves to pictorial interpretation and irony. One of his most popular themes are the ‘bandwallahs’ whom Khanna encountered when he was driving out of the Garhi studios in New Delhi. They were subjects from daily life were refugees after the partition of 1947. Many people on both sides of the border lost family and homes. At the same time, there were bands playing happy tunes. The Band members were dressed up and were in tatters at the same time. Khanna saw this as a metaphor for life; life has both tragic and happy moments that occur at the same time. 

Read More

Biren De Tantric Abstraction

Known for his Neo-Tantric paintings, Biren De molded an artistic career for himself across five decades, beginning as a portrait painter. The early works were figurative and strongly influenced by Post-Impressionist European painters. He gradually evolved into abstraction and by the sixties had abandoned figuration altogether, developing what became known as his signature ‘Neo-tantric’ style. His tantric style works show symmetrical patterns of geometry, concentric rings, crescents, and orbs. The presence of tantric symbols such as the mandala, phallus, and vagina which represent the masculine and feminine energies of the universe. De’s tantric works often had dark blues and bright reds which were meant to awaken the psyche towards an undivided consciousness.

Read More

Raghu Rai Photographs

Raghu Rai started taking photographs when he was 23 years old. In 1966, he joined the staff at The Statesman in Delhi. Henri Cartier-Bresson nominated Rai to join Magnum Photos in 1977 after seeing his work in an exhibition in Paris. From 1982 until 1992, Rai was the director of photography for India Today. There, he worked on special issues and designs, contributing trailblazing picture essays on social, political and cultural themes, many of which became the talking point of the magazine.

Read More

Jamini Roy: Sculpture Sketch

Jamini Roy’s inspiration of folk art led him to experiment with sculpture along with paintings and sketches even though he had no formal sculpture training. This artwork depicts a preparatory sketch of three sculptures similar to crude dolls from folk art. The viewer can see the block of wood and how Roy has planned on removing sections to make a complete sculpture. While this doll sculpture looks different from the typical doll, it can be considered to be an altered, expressionist version of it. The drawings are works on their own but his sculptures are more than just complements to his drawings. Intrigued by shadows, frontal view, silhouettes and the profile view of the sculpture, Roy uses the sketches to plan out his ideas on paper.

Read More

F N Souza's Noel Chemical

Francis Newton Souza was on modern India’s leaders of art and is known for his organic and complex growth in his works. In 1976, Souza migrated to New York and redefined his style of art. It was there that he developed his style of bold lines and cross-hatchings. Souza was known for his head portraits and also went on to use a chemical alteration and mixed media on posters and magazine covers. The chemical alterations was a method by which he used a chemical solvent on printed paper without destroying the surface. The ‘Souza head’ became one of his signature styles where he depicted a distorted head. Here, we can see Souza’s individuality and style defined and established with a felt pen on Christmas poster which has some chemical alterations.

Read More

Zainul Abedin: Bengal Famine

The Bengal Famine of 1943 -1944 ruined the lives of over three million people undivided India during WWII. The British allowed a diversion of food resources and drained the economy due to wartime industrial production. With the threat of a Japanese attack on Burma, the British carried out a boat denial and scorch plan that resulted in mass starvation. Zainul Abedin, who was born in undivided India witnessed the famine first hand. His sketches were made with his own ink by burning charcoal and used it on cheap, ordinary packing paper. He depicted starving, skeletal figures who were dying on the streets. These works became iconic images and helped Abedin find his way in a realistic approach that focused on human suffering, struggle, and protest.

Read More

Jamini Roy's Village Women

Jamini Roy's rejection of the western academic style of painting led to him being inspired by  Bengali folk paintings. Before he made the complete switch to the pat style paintings, he was depicting village life and folk. This work shows a personal reconstruction of another Indian reality that was often not seen in urban areas. Possibly an attempt to have art that could be accessible to a larger Indian audience, Roy broke away from classical traditions of art. Making his own paints, he experimented with his style and mediums. This work shows his typical hues of blue, yellows, red and browns that he made from local pigments.

Read More

Francis Newton Souza's Goan Village

Born in 1924, Souza is best known for being one of the founding members of the Progressive Artists Group. Francis Newton Souza’s ‘Goan Village’  is an early masterpiece of the Goa born artist.

Read More

Double Sided Ram Kumar : Mazes o...

Ram Kumar was an essential part of the first generation of postcolonial Indian artists.  He was born in Shimla, Himachal Pradesh in 1924 and was a member of the Bombay Progressive Artists Group along with other popular artists like Husain, Raza and Sadanand Bakre.

Read More

Steinway: Concert Grand Model D

Steinway & Sons, was established in 1853 in Manhattan by a German piano builder named Heinrich Engelhard. Steinway has since become well known for producing and inventing new techniques ever since they started the business. Today, they are arguably one of the best piano manufacturers in the world.

Read More

The Course of the Empire Series

One of the United State’s first landscape artists, Thomas Cole, can be considered as the father of the Hudson River School. Cole romanticized the wilderness of upstate New York. To him, wilderness and nature were meant to admired and respected. It was never meant to be controlled, tamed and made civilized.

Read More

It’s All Greek to Me!

Alexander the Great can be said to be responsible for the Greek influence in Ancient India. He started to conquer kingdoms in the east and made it all the way the modern Pakistan and the Indian state of Gujarat. He turned back once he was defeated by King Porus in 326 BCE.

Read More

Somnath Hore (1921 – 2006)

Somnath Hore was one of the most prominent political artist and activist of post-independence India. His affiliation to the Communist Party at an early age, strongly influenced his artistic ideologies and methods of art practice. However, his career as a student of art and later as an art practitioner was unlike his contemporaries.

Read More

Sailoz Mukherjee (1906-1960)

Sailoz Mukherjee was one of the pioneering figures of modern Indian art in the twentieth century. During the early forties, when India was at the peak of its struggle to attain her own independence and identity, the art community of the country was striving to locate their indigenous understanding of modernity.

Read More

K G Subramanyan (1924-2016)

K G Subramanyan’s artistic oeuvre reflects the synthesised modernism in post-independence India, that was devised to accommodate the varied Indian artistic aesthetics and history as a continuation of cultural pursuits. His engagement with the traditional forms and materials, rooted in the country’s psyche, steered a liberated generation of artists, in reconfiguring a more cohesive identity of Indian modernism.

Read More