Prinseps


F N Souza's Noel Chemical

Francis Newton Souza was on modern India’s leaders of art and is known for his organic and complex growth in his works. In 1976, Souza migrated to New York and redefined his style of art. It was there that he developed his style of bold lines and cross-hatchings. Souza was known for his head portraits and also went on to use a chemical alteration and mixed media on posters and magazine covers. The chemical alterations was a method by which he used a chemical solvent on printed paper without destroying the surface. The ‘Souza head’ became one of his signature styles where he depicted a distorted head. Here, we can see Souza’s individuality and style defined and established with a felt pen on Christmas poster which has some chemical alterations.

Read More

Zainul Abedin: Bengal Famine

The Bengal Famine of 1943 -1944 ruined the lives of over three million people undivided India during WWII. The British allowed a diversion of food resources and drained the economy due to wartime industrial production. With the threat of a Japanese attack on Burma, the British carried out a boat denial and scorch plan that resulted in mass starvation. Zainul Abedin, who was born in undivided India witnessed the famine first hand. His sketches were made with his own ink by burning charcoal and used it on cheap, ordinary packing paper. He depicted starving, skeletal figures who were dying on the streets. These works became iconic images and helped Abedin find his way in a realistic approach that focused on human suffering, struggle, and protest.

Read More

Jamini Roy's Village Women

Jamini Roy's rejection of the western academic style of painting led to him being inspired by  Bengali folk paintings. Before he made the complete switch to the pat style paintings, he was depicting village life and folk. This work shows a personal reconstruction of another Indian reality that was often not seen in urban areas. Possibly an attempt to have art that could be accessible to a larger Indian audience, Roy broke away from classical traditions of art. Making his own paints, he experimented with his style and mediums. This work shows his typical hues of blue, yellows, red and browns that he made from local pigments.

Read More

Francis Newton Souza's Goan Village

Born in 1924, Souza is best known for being one of the founding members of the Progressive Artists Group. Francis Newton Souza’s ‘Goan Village’  is an early masterpiece of the Goa born artist.

Read More

Double Sided Ram Kumar : Mazes o...

Ram Kumar was an essential part of the first generation of postcolonial Indian artists.  He was born in Shimla, Himachal Pradesh in 1924 and was a member of the Bombay Progressive Artists Group along with other popular artists like Husain, Raza and Sadanand Bakre.

Read More

Steinway: Concert Grand Model D

Steinway & Sons, was established in 1853 in Manhattan by a German piano builder named Heinrich Engelhard. Steinway has since become well known for producing and inventing new techniques ever since they started the business. Today, they are arguably one of the best piano manufacturers in the world.

Read More

The Course of the Empire Series

One of the United State’s first landscape artists, Thomas Cole, can be considered as the father of the Hudson River School. Cole romanticized the wilderness of upstate New York. To him, wilderness and nature were meant to admired and respected. It was never meant to be controlled, tamed and made civilized.

Read More

It’s All Greek to Me!

Alexander the Great can be said to be responsible for the Greek influence in Ancient India. He started to conquer kingdoms in the east and made it all the way the modern Pakistan and the Indian state of Gujarat. He turned back once he was defeated by King Porus in 326 BCE.

Read More

Somnath Hore (1921 – 2006)

Somnath Hore was one of the most prominent political artist and activist of post-independence India. His affiliation to the Communist Party at an early age, strongly influenced his artistic ideologies and methods of art practice. However, his career as a student of art and later as an art practitioner was unlike his contemporaries.

Read More

Sailoz Mukherjee (1906-1960)

Sailoz Mukherjee was one of the pioneering figures of modern Indian art in the twentieth century. During the early forties, when India was at the peak of its struggle to attain her own independence and identity, the art community of the country was striving to locate their indigenous understanding of modernity.

Read More

K G Subramanyan (1924-2016)

K G Subramanyan’s artistic oeuvre reflects the synthesised modernism in post-independence India, that was devised to accommodate the varied Indian artistic aesthetics and history as a continuation of cultural pursuits. His engagement with the traditional forms and materials, rooted in the country’s psyche, steered a liberated generation of artists, in reconfiguring a more cohesive identity of Indian modernism.

Read More

JAMINI ROY (1887 -1972)

One of the most iconic figures of modern Indian art of the mid-20th century, Jamini Roy’s reputation spilled over from the art world into a larger public and popular domain, and even as his name became synonymous in modern Indian art history with a reinvented "Bengali folk" style.

Read More

Bhabesh Chandra Sanyal 1901 – 2003

B C Sanyal, as he was popularly known, was a doyen of modernism in Indian art.

Read More

Sunayani Devi (1875 – 1962)

Sunayani Devi was an Indian painter born into the aristocratic Tagore family in Calcutta, West Bengal in 1875. She was a self taught artist with no academic training in art. Inspired by her brothers, Abanindranath Tagore, Gaganendranath Tagore, and Samarendranath Tagore, she started painting only at the age of 3. She was married at the age of 11 to the grandson of Raja Ram Mohan Roy.

Read More

Prodosh Dasgupta (1912-1991)

Prodosh Dasgupta was a crucial figure of that mid 20th century generation of artists in Bengal who were giving shape to a new vocabulary modernism in Indian art. His role was particularly important in defining a distinct place for modernism in Indian sculpture, in advocating the concept of form as an independent identity in sculpture, and in pioneering a style of semi-abstract three-dimensional figuration.

Read More

Sankho Chowdhury (1916 – 2006)

Sankho Chowdhury was one of the formative influences in the changing horizon of modern Indian sculpture.

Read More

What is Modernism?

The Tate Modern states that Modernism refers to a global movement in society and culture that from the early decades of the twentieth century sought a new alignment with the experience and values of modern industrial life.

Read More

What is Abstract Expressionism?

New York City was home to the founders of abstract expressionism. These artists became known as the New York school as a result. They were inspired by the surrealist idea that art should come from the unconscious mind. Within abstract expressionism were two broad groupings: the action painters - who attacked their canvases with expressive brush strokes and and the colour field painters - who filled their canvases with large areas of a single colour.

Read More

Bimal Dasgupta

Bimal Dasgupta (1917 – 1995) was one of the front runners of water colour traditions in Indian art during the second half of the twentieth century. His experiments with the conventions of the medium expanded the possibilities of painting methods, beyond the components of academic realism that was instructed in art schools.

Read More

Understanding Indian Sculpture

Sculptures are increasingly becoming popular investment grade collectibles. In some recent Modern art auctions during the end of 2018 Sadanand Bakre, Prodosh Dasgupta and Adi Davierwala sculptures sold for record-breaking prices.

Read More

F N Souza's Noel Chemical

Francis Newton Souza was on modern India’s leaders of art and is known for his organic and complex growth in his works. In 1976, Souza migrated to New York and redefined his style of art. It was there that he developed his style of bold lines and cross-hatchings. Souza was known for his head portraits and also went on to use a chemical alteration and mixed media on posters and magazine covers. The chemical alterations was a method by which he used a chemical solvent on printed paper without destroying the surface. The ‘Souza head’ became one of his signature styles where he depicted a distorted head. Here, we can see Souza’s individuality and style defined and established with a felt pen on Christmas poster which has some chemical alterations.

Read More

Zainul Abedin: Bengal Famine

The Bengal Famine of 1943 -1944 ruined the lives of over three million people undivided India during WWII. The British allowed a diversion of food resources and drained the economy due to wartime industrial production. With the threat of a Japanese attack on Burma, the British carried out a boat denial and scorch plan that resulted in mass starvation. Zainul Abedin, who was born in undivided India witnessed the famine first hand. His sketches were made with his own ink by burning charcoal and used it on cheap, ordinary packing paper. He depicted starving, skeletal figures who were dying on the streets. These works became iconic images and helped Abedin find his way in a realistic approach that focused on human suffering, struggle, and protest.

Read More

Jamini Roy's Village Women

Jamini Roy's rejection of the western academic style of painting led to him being inspired by  Bengali folk paintings. Before he made the complete switch to the pat style paintings, he was depicting village life and folk. This work shows a personal reconstruction of another Indian reality that was often not seen in urban areas. Possibly an attempt to have art that could be accessible to a larger Indian audience, Roy broke away from classical traditions of art. Making his own paints, he experimented with his style and mediums. This work shows his typical hues of blue, yellows, red and browns that he made from local pigments.

Read More

Francis Newton Souza's Goan Village

Born in 1924, Souza is best known for being one of the founding members of the Progressive Artists Group. Francis Newton Souza’s ‘Goan Village’  is an early masterpiece of the Goa born artist.

Read More

Double Sided Ram Kumar : Mazes o...

Ram Kumar was an essential part of the first generation of postcolonial Indian artists.  He was born in Shimla, Himachal Pradesh in 1924 and was a member of the Bombay Progressive Artists Group along with other popular artists like Husain, Raza and Sadanand Bakre.

Read More

Steinway: Concert Grand Model D

Steinway & Sons, was established in 1853 in Manhattan by a German piano builder named Heinrich Engelhard. Steinway has since become well known for producing and inventing new techniques ever since they started the business. Today, they are arguably one of the best piano manufacturers in the world.

Read More

The Course of the Empire Series

One of the United State’s first landscape artists, Thomas Cole, can be considered as the father of the Hudson River School. Cole romanticized the wilderness of upstate New York. To him, wilderness and nature were meant to admired and respected. It was never meant to be controlled, tamed and made civilized.

Read More

It’s All Greek to Me!

Alexander the Great can be said to be responsible for the Greek influence in Ancient India. He started to conquer kingdoms in the east and made it all the way the modern Pakistan and the Indian state of Gujarat. He turned back once he was defeated by King Porus in 326 BCE.

Read More

Somnath Hore (1921 – 2006)

Somnath Hore was one of the most prominent political artist and activist of post-independence India. His affiliation to the Communist Party at an early age, strongly influenced his artistic ideologies and methods of art practice. However, his career as a student of art and later as an art practitioner was unlike his contemporaries.

Read More

Sailoz Mukherjee (1906-1960)

Sailoz Mukherjee was one of the pioneering figures of modern Indian art in the twentieth century. During the early forties, when India was at the peak of its struggle to attain her own independence and identity, the art community of the country was striving to locate their indigenous understanding of modernity.

Read More

K G Subramanyan (1924-2016)

K G Subramanyan’s artistic oeuvre reflects the synthesised modernism in post-independence India, that was devised to accommodate the varied Indian artistic aesthetics and history as a continuation of cultural pursuits. His engagement with the traditional forms and materials, rooted in the country’s psyche, steered a liberated generation of artists, in reconfiguring a more cohesive identity of Indian modernism.

Read More

JAMINI ROY (1887 -1972)

One of the most iconic figures of modern Indian art of the mid-20th century, Jamini Roy’s reputation spilled over from the art world into a larger public and popular domain, and even as his name became synonymous in modern Indian art history with a reinvented "Bengali folk" style.

Read More

Bhabesh Chandra Sanyal 1901 – 2003

B C Sanyal, as he was popularly known, was a doyen of modernism in Indian art.

Read More

Sunayani Devi (1875 – 1962)

Sunayani Devi was an Indian painter born into the aristocratic Tagore family in Calcutta, West Bengal in 1875. She was a self taught artist with no academic training in art. Inspired by her brothers, Abanindranath Tagore, Gaganendranath Tagore, and Samarendranath Tagore, she started painting only at the age of 3. She was married at the age of 11 to the grandson of Raja Ram Mohan Roy.

Read More

Prodosh Dasgupta (1912-1991)

Prodosh Dasgupta was a crucial figure of that mid 20th century generation of artists in Bengal who were giving shape to a new vocabulary modernism in Indian art. His role was particularly important in defining a distinct place for modernism in Indian sculpture, in advocating the concept of form as an independent identity in sculpture, and in pioneering a style of semi-abstract three-dimensional figuration.

Read More

Sankho Chowdhury (1916 – 2006)

Sankho Chowdhury was one of the formative influences in the changing horizon of modern Indian sculpture.

Read More

What is Modernism?

The Tate Modern states that Modernism refers to a global movement in society and culture that from the early decades of the twentieth century sought a new alignment with the experience and values of modern industrial life.

Read More

What is Abstract Expressionism?

New York City was home to the founders of abstract expressionism. These artists became known as the New York school as a result. They were inspired by the surrealist idea that art should come from the unconscious mind. Within abstract expressionism were two broad groupings: the action painters - who attacked their canvases with expressive brush strokes and and the colour field painters - who filled their canvases with large areas of a single colour.

Read More

Bimal Dasgupta

Bimal Dasgupta (1917 – 1995) was one of the front runners of water colour traditions in Indian art during the second half of the twentieth century. His experiments with the conventions of the medium expanded the possibilities of painting methods, beyond the components of academic realism that was instructed in art schools.

Read More

Understanding Indian Sculpture

Sculptures are increasingly becoming popular investment grade collectibles. In some recent Modern art auctions during the end of 2018 Sadanand Bakre, Prodosh Dasgupta and Adi Davierwala sculptures sold for record-breaking prices.

Read More